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SPCA's annual List of Shame cites worst cruelty cases

Monday, 17 October, 2011

"The time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look upon the murder of men."

—Leonardo Da Vinci, Italian Painter, Sculptor, Architect, Musician, Engineer and Scientist

The SPCA annual List of Shame highlights the plight of animals throughout New Zealand and the abuse that occurs all-too often to creatures unable to speak for or defend themselves. This year’s list features some of the worst cases of abhorrent neglect and mistreatment of animals. The established link between the abuse of animals and violence to humans makes the following incidents even more poignant and relevant.

“This year’s List once again highlights the inhumanity meted out on the innocent and defenceless. Despite the Animal Welfare Act being extremely clear about the duty of care of owning animals, this year, we have cases of extreme neglect and failure to provide veterinary treatment," says Robyn Kippenberger, National Chief Executive of SPCA New Zealand. "And once again there are cases of violence to animals being used to exert power and control over the families that love them. Most disturbingly there are also incidents of young men wantonly killing and injuring animals without apparent reason."

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Pressure on Minister to ban cruel cages intensifies

Monday, 3 October, 2011

The nation's leading animal advocacy groups are joining forces today to call on the Minister of Agriculture to prevent the use of colony cages.

SPCA New Zealand and SAFE intend to use all measures available to strongly urge the Minister to ban cage farming for layer hens once and for all.

At a press conference tomorrow morning they will announce their united opposition to these cages, which coincides with an open letter being published in The Dominion Post asking the Minister to take a strong stance and declare that cages must not be an option for New Zealand.

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SPCA New Zealand against Queen Street sheep running

Monday, 15 August, 2011

SPCA New Zealand is calling for the proposed 'running of the sheep' down Auckland’s Queen Street to be removed from the Real New Zealand World Cup event in October.

A barrage of concerned calls from the public confirmed the SPCA's concerns around the proposal to run a mob of sheep down the main shopping street.

"Although we have been assured by the organisers that no harm will come to the sheep, this runs against the humane principles held by the SPCA around the use of animals for entertainment. If animals are likely to suffer, simply as a 'side show', then the SPCA believes that they should not be subject to this distress," says Robyn Kippenberger, National Chief Executive of SPCA New Zealand.

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New animal welfare legislation working

Wednesday, 6 July, 2011

Over the past week, two animal abusers have received prison sentences of 18 months and banned for 10 years and for life from owning animals.

“The new sentencing structure for the Animal Welfare Act, passed into legislation by unanimous parliamentary vote in July 2010, has already delivered two significant results in the past week” says Robyn Kippenberger, National Chief Executive of SPCA New Zealand.

Two cases of extreme animal abuse were heard in courts, the first, a puppy killing in Te Kuiti and yesterday judgement was passed on a case of kitten abuse in Te Awamutu. Both delivered 18 month sentences, surpassing any previous custodial period achieved by at least six months.

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Dunedin resident receives SPCA's Silver Medal

Monday, 23 May, 2011

When Alan Diack was first appointed a MAF stock inspector at Kurow in 1956, he little imagined he would still be deeply involved in caring for animals more than half a century later.

The Dunedin resident's long and distinguished career was celebrated by SPCA New Zealand at its National Conference in Wellington earlier this month, when he was awarded the SPCA's Silver Medal for his outstanding contribution to animal welfare at a local level.

"I'll be 80 later this year and no way did it occur to me, back in 1956, that I was starting down a path that would take me to this point," says the recently-retired veteran.

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